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FIVE CORE VALUES TO GUIDE OUR NETWORK

LOCAL AUTONOMY

Local values and principles will be respected and supported by the Network. Each member shall have complete creative freedom for local determination of their definition and meaning of recovery. Each stakeholder has the absolute right to determine the choice of services, venue of services and establish culturally relevant recovery experiences.

RECOVERY ORIENTATED

The NRN endorses and adopts the idea that recovery from mental health conditions and/or addiction emerges from hope; is person-driven; occurs via many pathways; is holistic; is supported by peers and allies; is supported through relationships and social networks; is culturally based and influenced; is supported by addressing trauma; involves individual, family, and community strengths and responsibility; and is based on respect.

ALL VOICES ARE IMPORTANT

Nevada Recovery Network is committed to providing equal voice and empower all of its members regardless of size, location or population served. Small rural and frontier recovery community organizations may serve smaller numbers of peers, but often have a larger impact on the wellness and Recovery Orientated Systems of Care than large urban providers; thus we are committed to the principle that each of our members’ voices should be treated as equal partners in the NRN.

THE NETWORK IS COMMITTED TO SERVICE

The sharing of information, technical assistance and fostering the growth and expansion of recovery services is vital to the mission of the Nevada Recovery Network. Access to these services shall not be used as a barrier for new or emerging members of the NRN.

EVERYONE MATTERS

Leadership of the Network will always be based on geographic diversity, proving equal participation from urban, rural and frontier areas. Care should be taken by the Network to respect, serve and provide support to all members of the NRN.

OUR FIVE ORGANIZING PRINCIPLES

DIGNITY & RESPECT

We believe that all of those seeking help for Mental Health and Addiction deserve to be treated equally and with dignity and respect at all times and deserve to receive culturally relevant and consumer specific service.

MANY PATHWAYS TO RECOVERY ARE EMBRACED

The process of recovery is highly personal and occurs via many pathways. It may include clinical treatment, medication assistance, faith-based approaches, peer support, family support, self-care, and other approaches. Recovery is characterized by continual growth and improvement in one’s health and wellness that may involve setbacks. Because setbacks are a natural part of life, resilience becomes a key component of recovery.

DIVERSITY OF SERVICE, DIVERSITY OF SETTINGS

We believe services that are organized and delivered by peers, coaches and mentoring focus on forming positive relationships, building recovery capital and improving wellness should be widely available in a broad diversity of settings. Recovery Community Organizations, faith-based organizations, community centers, schools, healthcare settings, tribal communities and social service agencies are but a few of the settings appropriate for recovery support services. Recovery support is provided through treatment and community-based programs by behavioral health care providers, peer providers, family members, friends, social networks, the faith community, and people with experience in recovery. Recovery support services help people enter into and navigate systems of care, remove barriers to recovery, stay engaged in the recovery process, and live full lives in communities of their choice.

SELF-DETERMINATION AND PERSON-CENTERED SERVICES

We believe services that are organized and delivered by peers, and focus on building positive relationships are valuable. Self-determination is a core element of recovery. When people direct their recovery, they direct a critical part of their lives. Peers are the experts on their own lives and the services that most benefit them. Because recovery is a highly individualized process, recovery services must be flexible to ensure cultural relevancy. What may work for adults in recovery may be very different for youth in recovery. For example, the promotion of resiliency in young people, and the nature of social supports, peer mentors, and recovery coaching for adolescents and transitional age youth are different than recovery support services for adults and older adults.

BROAD ACCESS & RECOVERY CENTERED SERVICES

We believe there must be increased access and better quality of behavioral health systems, services, treatment, and recovery supports geared toward empowering, resilience-oriented, and the promotion of an enhanced life in the community for those with behavioral health concerns. We will promote cross-service system, peer workforce, and infrastructure development that is recovery-focused and resiliency-oriented.

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